Types of Dementia

  • Dementia isn’t a single disease, but a term used to describe the symptoms of a range of illnesses which cause a progressive decline in the ability to think and perform everyday tasks. It can also lead to changes in personality and behaviour. While there is no cure for dementia, it’s important to keep in mind that it is possible to continue to maintain a good quality of life for many people. Continuing to do the things that are meaningful is the key to living well with dementia. Life may change, but finding ways to focus on physical and mental wellbeing makes dealing with the progression of the disease more manageable.

    https://www.opalhealthcare.com.au/about-aged-care/dementia/what-is-dementia

  • There are many types of dementia but he most common causes include Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies. While it is more commonly experienced in older people, dementia can sometimes occur in those under 65 years of age. This is known as younger onset dementia. One in ten people over the age of 65 experiences dementia, while three in ten are affected once they reach 85 years of age. Understanding the symptoms associated with each type of dementia can help in ensuring each person’s care needs are met.

    https://www.opalhealthcare.com.au/about-aged-care/dementia/types-of-dementia

  • Thinking about the move into residential care is never easy and can bring up all sorts of emotions. It’s time to start the conversation about moving into care when you have concerns that your loved one isn’t coping well with day-to-day activities or if you feel safety is a concern. They may be forgetting to do things like turn off the stove or even finding the way home when out for a walk. The earlier you start the conversation, the more time everyone will have to consider options and make informed decisions

  • Yes, consider a short stay in respite care to start with or perhaps arrange to go and have lunch or participate in an activity that your loved one enjoys. This will give you both you a chance to find out if the Care Community feels like a good fit and it will give you both confidence in your decision.

    It’s natural to feel apprehensive about making such a big decision. It’s important to remember that you’re not alone. Our team understand that it can feel overwhelming and they can provide direct support and suggest strategies to make things easier.

  • Moving house is among the most stressful life events. When moving house is combined with a big life change like moving into residential care, it can have a significant impact. Often the move into care comes about as a result of a traumatic event such as a fall rather than a considered decision process, so the circumstances around the move can feel overwhelming and out of the person’s control. Sometimes the person moving into care can take out their frustrations on their family if they don’t feel in control. It’s important to ensure that your loved one feels a part of the decisionmaking process. If this happens, try not to take it personally. Our team are here to help and support both you and your loved one through this time.

  • Home is not simply somewhere to live, it is a haven from the outside world and symbolic of who we are. Letting go of possessions accumulated over a lifetime which trigger memories of our past can lead to feelings of loss. It’s important when someone moves into care that they choose some things to bring with them that provide comfort and help to ease the transition to their new surroundings by providing security and familiarity. That might be things like soft furnishings, artwork or ornaments with special sentimental value. Speak with our leadership team to discuss the sort of things that might make your loved one feel at home.

  • Everyone’s different but on average you can expect most people to start feeling more comfortable and at home in around two to six weeks. It’s a big adjustment so try not to get disheartened if it seems to take a while. The most important thing is to just take each day at a time and speak with our leadership team if you have any concerns.

Types of care in our Care Communities

Permanent Residential

Permanent Residential

When you move into one of our Care Communities we strive to help you feel at home every day. Each one of our homes is fully accredited by the Australian Aged Care Quality Commission and has a registered nurse on every shift, every day and night.

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Respite Care

Respite Care

Many of our Opal HealthCare Care Communities offer respite options that enable caregivers to take a planned or unforeseen break from caring, secure in the knowledge that loved ones are enjoying uninterrupted care and companionship.

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Wellness and Reablement

Wellness and Reablement

We care deeply about bringing positivity and possibility into our elders’ lives. Our Wellness Centres promote rehabilitation and reablement, offering evidence-based treatment programs and individualised services to improve independence, quality of life and emotional and physical well-being.

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